A Few Ideas

A Few Ideas

A Few Ideas

By Ruth Greene-McNally Bacon studied at the Art Students League between 1914-1920, where she was influenced by the realistic prints of her teachers, John Sloan and George Bellows. She achieved early success as a printmaker, illustrator, and author of over sixty children’s books. She later turned her attention to fine art, painting in watercolor, pastel,…

Seeing is Believing: Dodd at Ogunquit

By Linda Chestney Technology says that an airbrush refines a painting. Tradition says it’s a paintbrush. Smart artists know that art is delivered by the eyes, which ignite the senses: https://artscopemagazine.com/2018/09/seeing-is-believing-dodd-at-ogunquit/    

THE OGUNQUIT ART COLONY (1922-1952)

By Ruth Greene-McNally*   By the early 20th century, the allure of Narrow Cove attracted greater numbers of artists, gallerists, collectors, and sightseers who had discovered the secluded fishing community named Ogunquit the “beautiful place by the sea” by the Abenaki tribe nearly a century earlier. The opportunity to work and study art informally or…

Visual Arts Review: Ogunquit Museum of American Art

In a suite of small exhibitions, the Ogunquit Museum of American Art demonstrates how much power can be generated by art executed in multiple mediums. Lois Dodd’s expressionist paintings, Bill Viola’s video installation, and a joint show of photography and poetry by Jacob Bond Hessler and Richard Blanco illustrate the rich variety of human experience…

Art review: Lois Dodd done justice in Ogunquit

By Daniel Kany Lois Dodd is arguably the most admired painter within the state of Maine. Although she was born in New Jersey and has spent most of her life in New York, she represents the fundamental ethics of Maine painting: common sense, intelligence, freedom from unnecessary decoration, work-honed skill, and humility. Art review: Lois…

Taking the Plunge

“The two forces that have done the most to shape who we are as human beings, both inside and out, and throughout history, are technology and revelation.” – Bill Viola, quoting Huston Smith in a 2009 interview Taking the Plunge  

Michael Mansfield

By Sarah Bouchard Not all artists can afford a traditional, daily studio practice. For some, the studio is a state of mind entered into on the drive home after a long day packed with professional obligations. These artists make exceptional work while maintaining an alternate identity – be it teacher, parent, janitor, or doctor. For…

CELEBRATING 65 YEARS: A MUSEUM of ART for the COMMUNITY 

By Ruth Greene-McNally* With a vision to build “a museum of art for the community,” Henry Strater, along with Rudy Dirks and Robert Laurent, purchased the meadow overlooking Narrow Cove, formerly owned by Charles Woodbury. The Museum of Art of Ogunquit incorporated on September 18, 1951 with the founder’s mission for “broad educational interests of…

An Artist’s Paradise (1880s-1922)

By Ruth Greene-McNally When Charles Herbert Woodbury proclaimed the view from Narrow Cove “an artist’s paradise” he was not the first artist to discover the potential for an artist haven in the secluded seacoast village of Ogunquit. Distinguished American painters John Enneking, Maurice Prendergast, Dwight Tryon, and Joseph Davol painted in Ogunquit as early as…

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